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content management

Thema book subject codes: a “huge leap forward”?

The "huge leap forward" were the words of The Bookseller's BookBrunch newsletter, reporting (21 June 2016) a new version (1.2) of the Thema ebook classification scheme (released in May 2016). Normally a point release of a standard is isn't a huge leap forward, so I was curious to know more. Because BookBrunch is open only to subscribers, I can’t see who is responsible for that "huge leap forward" comment. But the Thema classification scheme itself is open and accessible to anyone who wants to find out more details of this new initiative for book classification.

Can you charge for adding metadata to free content?

Clearly you can. A recent post in Book Business Magazine describes how McGraw-Hill Education will include free teaching resources within its paid education platform, Engrade, alongside its own paid resources, on the basis that these free resources are better curated and hence easier to find and to make use of. However, users will be charged for access to the free resources within the platform, since McGraw-Hill state they have had to pay to have them tagged. McGraw-Hill is open about what they are doing: they say they pay to have the material selected for quality and then tagged, so it is only reasonable to charge end users for the selection and better navigation.

Engrade

 

Books versus journals

 

"Users’ expectations are different for these two. When you search books you expect an answer; when you search journal articles, a scholar expects a list of things to read. A book represents late-stage work, not the early-stage work of journal articles."

 

Thus Anurag Acharya, one of the founders of Google Scholar, on different kinds of reading, at the ALPSP Annual Conference in October 2015 (a presentation helpfully summarised by John Sacks in a Scholarly Kitchen post).

 

“You can easily see the difference between these two modalities. Do a search in Google for “San Francisco weather” and the answer pops up: the current temperature and conditions, and the forecast. But for the “weather scholar” there is also a list of sites below the forecast that you can go to if you want to study the topic by reading web pages about San Francisco weather.”

Why people prefer print to online TV listings

It is commonplace nowadays to predict the inexorable decline of print as it is steadly replaced by online information. Without wishing to be a luddite, I an intrigued when there are examples of print surviving and even prospering in the face of digital competition, especially when dealing with the display of information in a typical situation where users are seeking an answer. A recent Financial Times article pointed out that TV listings guides are not losing circulation – which is not what many commentators predicted. One common argument is that TV print magazines sell to an ageing audience who prefer print to online; but in fact, TV listing guides comprise three of the top five UK magazine circulations, with the top spot held by TV Choice – a print magazine that has increased its circulation by 63% since 2000, the very period when you might expect its circulation to be falling. What is it that people find so compelling about print TV guides?

The London Book Fair 2014: Upstairs, Downstairs

There seemed to be two different events at this year’s Book Fair. Downstairs, in the main hall, there were new books galore, events with authors and celebrities. In the rights section, agents were working flat out to sell rights in hundreds of different territories. It was business as usual, as it has been for the last 38 years. But elsewhere upstairs it was a different story.<--break->

Content modelling - new bottles, old wine?

Content modelling is on everyone’s lips these days, yet it’s a term that seems not to have existed just a few years ago. Is it some entirely new concept? As usual, a quick look on the Web reveals several definitions, some of which concur, and most of which differ in emphasis.

So, for Cleve Gibbon, a content model is a representation of the types of content and their inter-relationships. For example, a car dealership may have content types for vehicle, dealer and manufacturer. This, of course, is where you start when modelling a relational database.

A genuine XML workflow for journals

The terms "XML workflow" and "XML first" are used so frequently that it is as if the simple repetition of the terms provides sufficient proof that what is claimed to be happening is actually taking place. Many workflows that claim to be XML first do not provide full round-tripping of the content, and certainly not at the same time being fully compliant with the industry-standard DTD. At a recent presentation by Rave Technologies (London, 19 November) a genuine 100% XML workflow was demonstrated for journals, and it was impressive in several ways.

Safari Flow - can you improve on Safari?

O'Reilly's new initiative, Safari Flow, which is currently available in beta form, is a timely prompt to review the success, and the qualities, of its elder brother, Safari Books Online. For several years Safari Books Online has been a great exemplar of digital publishing. For some users, including me, it represented a far more fundamental shift to digital delivery than the later, and seemingly more successful, rise of e-books.

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